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ZEDAZENI MONASTERY

Zedazeni is one of the oldest Georgian monasteries. Its history dates back to 510s, when St. John of Zedazeni (Ioane Zedazneli in Georgian), the leader of the group of monks known as “thirteen Syrian Fathers,” secluded himself on the summit of Mount Zeda Zadeni.

RABAT FORTRESS IN AKHALTSIKHE

Akhaltsikhe is one of the oldest Georgian cities, being known from written sources since the twelfth century. As an important military stronghold and regional political centre, it always attracted the attention of neighboring powers that aimed to dominate over the South Caucasus region. In the 1570s, Akhaltsikhe was conquered and remained under Ottoman rule until 1828, when the city was captured by the Russian Empire.

Tbilisi Architecture Biennial

Tbilisi Architecture Biennial, conceived under the name “What Do We Have in Common''. Purpose of the projects has a far-reaching significance that will resonate in the future.

OLD HOTELS OF TBILISI

History of Tbilisi hotels is one of the bridges that link Georgian history with European history.

Medieval Georgian Reliefs

Medieval Georgian sculpture was formed in the bosom of local culture under the influence of Hellenistic and Persian, as well as the East Christian artistic traditions.

Architecture of Georgia in the Years of Independence

The first years of independence turned to be very tough for Georgia. The painful process of transformation from planned command system to market economy was accompanied by military conflicts and political chaos that caused deep social and economic crisis of the country in the early 1990s.

TBILISI OPERA HOUSE

The first opera performances in Tbilisi were staged in the mid-nineteenth century. The present building of Tbilisi Opera and Ballet State Theatre was constructed from 1880 to 1896 by Viktor Schroeter, a prolific architect from St-Petersbourg who worked in many cities of the Russian Empire.

SVETITSKHOVELI

The Svetitskhoveli Cathedral in Mtskheta is Georgia’s most famous landmark. According to Georgian tradition, it stands on the burial site of the Christ's chiton.

CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS NEAR MTSKHETA (JVARI CHURCH)

After the conversion of Iberia (east Georgia) around 330, St Nino, the illuminatrix of Georgia, erected a large wooden cross on the mountaintop near Mtskheta, which drew a lot of worshippers. Chroniclers mention it as an important pilgrimage site and one of the most sacred places in the Caucasus. Between 545 and 586, a small church, the so-called Minor Church of the Holy Cross, was built next to the cross. The Major church that covered the wooden cross was constructed between 586 and 605. It is a tetraconch, i. e. a domed building with four apses arranged in the cardinal directions. Between the apses there are additional chambers in all four corners, which communicate with the central space by means of 3/4 circular niches. The transition from the central square bay to the octagonal drum and further to the circle of the dome is effected through three rows of squinches.

MEDIEVAL CHURCH ARCHITECTURE IN GEORGIA

The Christian architecture in Georgia begins around 330, when Christianity became the state religion. The newly converted King Mirian built the first church in the royal garden in Mtskheta, the ancient capital of East Georgian kingdom, on the site believed to be the burial place of the Christ's chiton. Emperor Constantine, willing to promote King Mirian's building activity, sent architects and masons to Georgia. Chronicles say that "the Greeks" built four churches in different regions of the country, but Constantinopolitan builders did not exert essential influence on the further development of Georgian church architecture.

Explore The Historical Monuments of Mtskheta with ATINATI

The Historical Monuments of Mtskheta were inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1994. The property consists of the Jvari Monastery, the Svetitstkhoveli Cathedral and the Samtavro Monastery. Major archaeological remains bearing witness to the high level of art and culture of Georgia over four millennia.