/
menu
/

Kitty Machabeli

Dr. Kitty Machabeli (კიწი მაჩაბელი), Senior Research Fellow at the G. Chubinashvili National Research Center for Georgian Art History and Heritage Preservation, Professor Emerita at the Tbilisi State Academy of Fine Arts. She graduated from Tbilisi State University, Faculty of History. She is the author of 23 books and more than two hundred papers on various problems of late antique, medieval, East Christian, and modern Georgian art. Her research laid the foundation for an art historical study of late antique silversmiths in Georgia. Her publications on early medieval Georgian sculpture fostered our knowledge in this field. She holds several honors, including the G. Chubinashvili award (2010), the Georgian Artists Union award for the Best Publication of the Year (1982), and Georgian Academy of Sciences Certificate of Excellence in Scholarship (2016)

Articles

27/02/2024

MEDIEVAL GEORGIAN RELIEFS

Medieval Georgian sculpture was formed in the bosom of local culture under the influence of Hellenistic and Persian, as well as the East Christian artistic traditions.

27/02/2024

EARLY MEDIEVAL GEORGIAN STONE CROSSES

The custom of erecting crosses in Georgia traces back to the time of Christianization of the Kingdom of Kartli in the 4th century. According to Georgian church tradition St. Nino, who converted Kartli to the new faith, put up wooden crosses in place of pagan idols to symbolize the country’s Christianization.

27/02/2024

MEDIEVAL GEORGIAN METALWORK

Georgian metalwork of the Middle Ages is an important phenomenon in the history of art. The ancient local tradition of goldsmith and silversmith has continued throughout the Christian era. Georgian masters produced a wide range of church artifacts: crosses, icons, book-covers, liturgical implements. For their creations, the Georgian masters mainly used silver, which was frequently plated with gold. Some non-ecclesiastical silver vessels from the 12th–13th century have also been preserved along with the precious metal object of church art.

27/02/2024

ARMAZI GOLDEN TREASURE

In the 1940s, archaeologists discovered the necropolis of the Pitiakhshs, rulers of Iberia (eastern Georgia) in Armazi, which was part of the ancient Georgian capital, Mtskheta. The graves of the ruling aristocracy were distinguished by numerous precious objects, including various types of jewelry: necklaces, rings, earrings, buckles golden clothes adornments. The discovered objects are striking for their sophisticated technical and aesthetic qualities, indicating the highly-developed tradition of goldsmithery in eastern Georgia during the first centuries CE.

27/02/2024

GEORGIAN RELIEF PORTRAIT OF THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES

Secular portraiture in Medieval Georgia developed in close connection with religious art. The creation of “portraits” was connected with the ongoing socio-political processes in the country, particularly with the strengthening of feudal society. As in Byzantium, images of feudal lords appeared in church art in the 6th – 7th cc. Insertion of the figures of laymen into the decoration programs of the churches and stone cross pillars aimed to demonstrate their power and place in the feudal hierarchy.

27/02/2024

LITURGICAL IMPLEMENTS OF MEDIEVAL GEORGIA

Liturgical vessels and implements, such as chalices, liturgical fans - rhipidia, censers, are inseparable parts of the church Services. These precious metal objects decorated with religious imagery were produced in huge numbers over the centuries in medieval Georgia, but very few of them have preserved.

27/02/2024

ARMAZI SILVER TREASURE

Archeological excavations in Armaziskhevi unearthed numerous artifacts of significant importance characterized by high aesthetic and technical quality that shed light on the art of silversmiths in pre-Christian Kartli (a Kingdom in Eastern Georgia). The silver and golden objects found in the necropolis of local governors (pitiakhshs) bear witness to active cultural exchange between Kartli and various countries of the East and West (e. g. Iran, Rome, etc.). Silver and golden objects have both material and aesthetic value. Due to its physical and technical properties, silver has been highly valued since antiquity. This precious metal was widely used for vessels, tableware, jewelry, and furniture decoration. Excavated artifacts from Armaziskhevi, dating from the first to third centuries CE, once belonging to the local aristocracy demonstrate their luxurious lifestyle and wealth.

AUTHORS AT ATINATI